EGGstatic over Tea Eggs!

Did you know it was National EGG Day?

That is, it WAS National Egg Day — on June 3– and I missed it!

Or at least I missed writing this post and publishing it on National Egg Day. Actually, I was busy making these Tea Eggs and thinking how easy they are and how delicious they are and that I needed to share about this great food!

Say all you want about the unique and …. potentially delicious… eggs cooked over an open fire in a long handled, hand-hammered ‘spoon’  (read more) I admit they are intriguing and I might have to attempt them sometime but for now, these Asian Tea Eggs have my attention. They are quick and easy, have a greater “satisfaction time” (get more servings in one cooking and they ‘hold’ for a longer period of time) and… they are delicious. Not having tasted the eggs cooked over a fire in a big spoon, I can’t say if one is more delicious than the other, but I can say these Tea Eggs are addictive!

The concept and flavors intrigued me but I was hesitant. Just in case I didn’t like them, I prepared only 3 eggs. Most of the recipes are for 6 or 12. The ingredients are easy to adjust. My first batch was devoured – practically inhaled! — and a second batch was started immediately.

Now I am keeping Tea Eggs in the refrigerator for easy snacking and adding to salads etc.

In comparing recipes (there are numerous recipes available —just google them) they all have the same basic ingredients and preparation: Soy Sauce, Tea and Spices (usually Anise and Mandarin Orange peel) flavoring a broth in which hard boiled eggs are further cooked and then ‘steeped’ in this flavorful aromatic liquid. The shells of the cooked eggs are gently smashed all over but not removed before the eggs go into the broth. Later, when the shells are removed prior to eating – they slip off quite easily – the egg whites have an intriguing ‘crackled’ marble appearance.

Mine look just like the pictures on the internet. I use brown eggs to start, so the shell color is darker after steeping.  I have not yet attempted to cook the eggs in a way to keep the yolk bright yellow, but I don’t mind the dark edge. There are some recipes suggesting a ‘clean’ yellow yolk.

A good description of this egg preparation from one recipe says “it’s like giving (plain and dry) hard boiled eggs a makeover”.

Give these great Tea Eggs a try –and let me know what you think of them!

 

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